Saturday, 8 November 2008

Aurel Stein in the spotlight !!!


The internet is a delightful medium. Positioned behind your screen in your comfortable armchair in a split of a second you can travel back in time to the fascinating and adventurous time at the beginning of the 20th century.
Due to an exhibition in Hong Kong the library of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences has made and published from the photographs, maps and letters of the Aurel Stein's bequest a superb website through which anyone who was not there in Hong Kong can visit this exhibition at any moment of the day ( or night).

To go to this exhibition, click on: Fascinated by the Orient: Aurel Stein 1862-1943.

3 comments:

Studiolum said...

Hello, I am the maker of the site you were so kind to advertise here. Thank you very much! However, I'm sincerely curious how you found it, if I just uploaded it on the server of the Academy two days ago. You must have a very good eye and a researcher’s luck comparable to Stein’s…

I have also written about the preparation of this site in my blog several times, for example here, and finally yesterday here.

We have also prepared a previous site at the Academy for the centenary of the discovery of the Dunhuang Cave Library by Stein, at http://dunhuang.mtak.hu, it is also worth to visit.

Mongols, China and the Silk Road said...

Unfortunately the mysterie is smaller than you thought and therefor their is also less glory for me in it !!!
A few days ago the IDP newsletter no 31 was published (http://idp.bl.uk/archives/news_current/news_current.a4d#6 ) and your site was mentioned there.
I have to congratulate you with this site. The contents are well known but the photographs were really beautifull and many of them unknown to me.
I am going to read your blog now and come back to you later.
Best regards,
Hans van Roon

Don David said...

Hello,

I was wondering if you knew anything about Robert Shawn, who the supposedly the first "Englishmen" to go to Yarkan and Kashgar in 1871?

Anyways I have to congratulate your blog, which is very interesting.
Cheers,

David